Foundation Awards $5.7 Million in Grants to 44 Organizations

 

(ST. LOUIS)  −  Forty-four Missouri nonprofits have received a total of  $5.7 million in grants recently awarded by the Missouri Foundation for Health (MFH).  Funding assists organizations that work to improve the health of thousands of Missourians, especially the uninsured and underserved.  Grants in this round of funding support nonprofits’ advocacy efforts; projects to improve patients’ understanding of medical information; obesity prevention; tobacco prevention and cessation; organizational development; and programs for people with mental health and substance abuse disorders.  Click on an organization’s highlighted name to be directed to its website.

Seventeen grants totaling $2.4 million come through MFH’s General Support for Advocacy  (GSA) funding program.  These grants support nonprofits involved in health-related public policy advocacy work on behalf of Missouri residents.  GSA grants were awarded to:

American Cancer Society, St. Louis, $150,000.  Funding helps the organization continue to support improved care for cancer patients, especially those who are underserved, uninsured and underinsured.

American Lung Association of the Great Plains-Gulf Region, St. Louis, $150,000.  Funding helps the organization support clean air and tobacco control efforts, and improve lung health disparities.

Catholic Charities Community Services, St. Louis, $150,000.  With funding, the organization continues to focus on advocacy for the poor and vulnerable.

Central Reform Congregation, St. Louis, $150,000.  Funding helps the congregation work toward better access to health care through education and advocacy.

Disability Resource Association of Jefferson County, Crystal City, $150,000.  With funding, the St. Louis-area organization continues to advocate for better health care for seniors, low-income residents and people with disabilities.

Interfaith Residence/Doorways, St. Louis, $150,000.  With funding, the organization is continuing to support health care, housing and social services for people living with HIV/AIDS.

Lutheran Family and Children’s Services of Missouri, St. Louis, $150,000.  Funding helps the organization work toward better care for vulnerable Missourians through education and public policy work.

Metropolitan Congregations United for St. Louis, St. Louis, $150,000.  Funding helps the organization advocate for causes such as better health care for underserved residents.

Missouri Association of Area Agencies on Aging, Jefferson City, $84,000.  With funding, the organization continues to advocate for health-related policy that supports seniors’ needs.

Missouri Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence, Jefferson City, $150,000.  Funding helps the organization support social and systemic change to end violence against women and children.

Missouri Rural Crisis Center, Columbia, $150,000.  With funding, the central Missouri organization continues to support efforts such as health care advocacy and the production of nutritious, sustainable foods.

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), St. Louis, $150,000.  Funding helps the organization continue to advocate for the needs of people with serious mental illness.

National Multiple Sclerosis Society, St. Louis, $150,000.  Funding helps the organization continue to advocate for research and a cure for people with multiple sclerosis.

Northeast Missouri Rural Health Network, Kirksville, $66,000.  With funding, the northeast Missouri organization continues to advocate for better access to, and quality of, health care services for rural residents.

SEMO Alliance for Disability Independence Inc., Cape Girardeau, $150,000.  Funding helps the southeast Missouri organization support efforts to improve quality of life for people with disabilities.

Southwest Center for Independent Living, Springfield, $150,000.  With funding, the southwest Missouri organization continues to advocate for independent living and a barrier-free environment for people with disabilities.

Vision for Children at Risk, St. Louis, $150,000.  Funding helps the organization advocate for better health care for children and youth, especially those in at-risk populations.


MFH made five grants totaling $988,341 through its Health Literacy funding program.  Health Literacy grants help organizations improve Missourians’ understanding of important health information, and enhance communication between consumers and care providers.  Organizations receiving Health Literacy grants are:

Centro Latino de Salud, Columbia, $200,000.  Funding helps the central Missouri organization expand a Promotoras de Salud (community health workers) program to increase health literacy among African-American community members in Columbia.

Jordan Valley Community Health Center, Springfield, $196,626.  With funding, the southwest Missouri health center is developing two programs aimed at educating patients:  group-based prenatal training for expectant mothers, and a new county library branch inside its facility.

Saint Louis University, St. Louis, $199,796.  With funding, the university is collaborating with Great Mines Health Center in Washington County to develop a toolkit helping health care providers promote health literacy in underserved communities.

St. Louis College of Pharmacy, St. Louis, $199,382.  Funding helps the school expand its health literacy curriculum for pharmacy students; and engage students, faculty and alumni in community outreach to promote health literacy.

The Kitchen Inc., Springfield, $192,537.  Funding helps the southwest Missouri organization educate its primary care patients about exercise, nutrition and weight management to promote healthier lifestyles. 

Ten grants totaling more than $1.9 million come through MFH’s Healthy & Active Communities (H&AC) funding initiative.  H&AC targets community-based organizations reaching populations at increased risk of developing obesity, including women and children, racial and ethnic groups and low-income individuals and families.  Organizations receiving H&AC grants are:

Central Missouri Community Action, Columbia, $96,515.  With funding, the central Missouri organization is completing a health impact assessment, which can be used by policymakers to determine potential health-related effects of policies and community projects.

City of Cabool, $198,285.  Funding helps the southern Missouri community construct exercise trails, work with local organizations to promote wellness and exercise programs, and improve walkability and bikability of the area.

City of St. Louis Department of Health, $223,061.  Funding helps the department increase low-income neighborhoods’ access to healthy, fresh foods through a healthy corner store program.

City of Sikeston, $210,421.  With funding, the southeast Missouri community is expanding its exercise trail facilities to encourage walking, jogging and biking.

Clark County Health Department, Kahoka, $265,896.  Funding helps the northeast Missouri health department promote wellness and exercise to schools, businesses, seniors and people with special care needs by improving area sidewalks and bike paths.

FOCUS St. Louis, $1,500.  Funding helps the organization conduct a project to strengthen the Old North Grocery Co-Op’s financial sustainability.

Madison Medical Center, Fredericktown, $299,110.  With funding, the southeast Missouri hospital is constructing a walking and biking trail and playground facilities, and promoting a county farmers’ market.

Ozarks Regional YMCA, Springfield, $296,911.  The southwest Missouri organization is using funding to educate more than 2,000 students about farm-fresh foods through its after-school and summer day camp programs.

Pulaski County Sheltered Workshop, Richland, $62,917.  The central Missouri organization is using funding to build a greenhouse and train clients to operate it, providing fresh produce for themselves, staff and low-income families.

Saint Louis University, St. Louis, $295,627.  Funding supports a university project to promote locally grown foods, local food processing and training for public schools in the area.

Eleven grants totaling $106,921 come through MFH’s Mental Health & Substance Abuse (MHSA) program.  MHSA currently supports nonprofits’ efforts to assist patients experiencing “co-occurring” mental illness and substance abuse disorders.  Grant recipients are:

Bootheel Counseling Services, Sikeston, $10,000.  Funding helps the southeast Missouri organization integrate mental health and substance abuse programs into primary care services.

Bridgeway Behavioral Health, St. Charles, $9,769.  The St. Louis-area organization is using funding to enhance its staff’s capabilities to assist patients with mental health and substance abuse issues.

Burrell Behavioral Health, Springfield, $10,000.  Funding helps the southwest Missouri organization continue to train staff and track patient progress in dealing with mental health and substance abuse issues.

Crider Health Center, Wentzville, $7,177.  With funding, the St. Louis-area center is enhancing its ability to provide services to people with mental health and substance abuse disorders.

Hopewell Center, St. Louis, $10,000.  Funding helps the center implement age-appropriate screening tools to better identify patients with mental health and substance abuse disorders, and to provide training to clinical staff.

Mark Twain Behavioral Health, Hannibal, $10,000.  The northeast Missouri organization is using funding to further develop its dual disorders treatment program.

Ozarks Medical Center, West Plains, $10,000.  Funding helps the southern Missouri organization integrate co-occurring disorder treatment into its existing patient programs.

Phoenix Programs Inc., Columbia, $10,000.  With funding, the central Missouri organization is developing new treatment planning processes for patients with mental health and substance abuse disorders.

Places for People Inc., St. Louis, $10,000.  Funding helps the organization perform staff training and enhance its ability to serve patients with mental health and substance abuse disorders.

Queen of Peace Center, St. Louis, $10,000.  Funding helps the organization improve patient participation in recovery planning, including the creation of women’s self-help groups.

Southeast Missouri Behavioral Health, Park Hills, $9,975.  The organization is using funding to increase efficiency, improve client retention and work with community partners to enhance recovery care.

MFH’s Strategic Organizational Development (SOD) funding program supports specific, short-term interventions that help an organization or coalition build capacity, improve operational efficiency and become more effective in improving Missourians’ health.  A SOD grant was awarded to:

Pony Bird Inc., Mapaville, $15,000.  The St. Louis-area organization, which provides services for people with severe disabilities, is using funding to conduct strategic planning activities.

MFH’s Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Initiative (TPCI) is a multi-year effort to reduce tobacco use in the state through a variety of funding strategies.  MFH awarded a TPCI grant to:

Missouri Department of Mental Health, Jefferson City, $243,653.  Funding helps the health department work with Community Treatment Inc. (COMTREA), Crider Health Center and Queen of Peace Center to engage clients and staff in tobacco cessation programs.

Established in 2000, MFH is the largest nongovernmental funder of community health activities in Missouri.  MFH is in its ninth year of grantmaking, having issued more than $434 million in grants and awards to date.  It is dedicated to improving the health of unserved and underserved residents in 84 Missouri counties and the City of St. Louis.  


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